Painting Progression 3 ‘Juno’

March 7, 2021

Juno was the sister and wife (hmmm) of Jupiter, and the mother of Mars and Vulcan. The patron goddess of Rome and protector of women and marriage, Juno’s name is heard in Virgil’s Aeneid, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and Sean O’Casey’s 1924 play Juno and the Paycock.” [source: https://nameberry.com/babyname/Juno%5D

Although I’m posting these progressive treatments over a few days, this painting actually took me several weeks. That’s because I just wasn’t sure how to go about it. Painting complicated hair/fur isn’t my forte. And watercolour isn’t a terribly forgiving medium. So I ultimately chose to use Daniel Smith’s Watercolour Ground applied over white art board. The lovely quality of this product is how easily one can lift mistakes off it–it lifts previously applied, and dried paint, like a dream. What it therefore doesn’t allow is a number of washes or glazes on top of each other, because once a fresh wash is placed over a dried wash, that old one will lift and mix with the new wet one. So my experience has been to use one put-down of wash and let that be the one, and if it doesn’t look good, just put water all over it and lift it right off and wait till the surface has dried and start again.

4 Responses to “Painting Progression 3 ‘Juno’”

  1. Thank you dear sister, Arlyce, for your constant support and over the top praise, (smile).

    Like

  2. This presentation is remarkable. It could be a photograph but goes beyond to even better ~ like reality being portrayed not in a movie but a stage play. It’s lovely, lively and engaging ~ which is a tribute to the pup and to the artist. So glad to ‘actually’ meet this wee charmer. Thank you for sharing.

    On Sun, Mar 7, 2021 at 2:12 PM weisserwatercolours wrote:

    > weisserwatercolours posted: ” “Juno was the sister and wife (hmmm) of > Jupiter, and the mother of Mars and Vulcan. The patron goddess of Rome and > protector of women and marriage, Juno’s name is heard in Virgil’s Aeneid, > Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and Sean O’Casey’s 1924 play Juno and ” >

    Liked by 1 person

  3. memadtwo said

    Like Nina, I love the addition of small creatures. (K)

    Like

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