Start to Finish . . .

February 7, 2012

Though I’ve certainly seen this done many times on websites and in books, I’ve never taken photos of a painting of mine as it progresses from a drawing to a finished piece.  Whether it proves interesting or useful is anyone’s guess, but here goes . . .

I sought out written permission from the Irish Photographer Joseph Hogan to use his images to create watercolours.  This is necessary whenever an artist chooses to make use of another artist’s image(s).  I have paintings which I’ve done from photos I’ve found on the internet but won’t post them here (nor sell them) because I’ve yet to go about getting explicit permission to use the original image.

In any case, here is the image I am using for a painting entitled “Winter Barn“. . . .

Original Photograph by Joseph Hogan (used with Joe's exclusive permission)

The first step is for me to choose the right kind of paper.  It took me about ten years to discover ‘my’ paper–the one that receives my style of painting the best. (And there are honking bunches of types of paper out there beckoning watercolourists.)  For this particular subject I chose Arches 140 lb. Cold Press Paper, because it has a creamy hue and just a bit of tooth to it.  My other preferred paper is Arches 140 lb. Hot Press Paper which is smooth as glass (which is what I used for ‘Winter Horses’, for example).  Both papers receive the paint in a different way.

I first decided to change this photo into a night scene.  For me it is important to establish a definite and personal mood, to embody the photograph–use it to draw out from me what I feel when I see it–let my mind take me back to similar scenes in time’s past.

When we lived in Granville, New York, we lived in the Baptist Parsonage (my father was a Pastor)  and it was a 19th Century house with the original horse barn for our garage.  Sitting at its open back door, I remember looking at the host of stars while sneaking a Marlboro, and wondering what my life was going to involve.  (And, lo and behold, it involved a prolonged effort to finally give up those deliciously-sinful Marlboros).  But I sat there rain or shine or snow–usually at night–and thought my thoughts and enjoyed just being me instead of a Pastor’s son.

Back to the task at hand—I made a detailed drawing of the barn, used a prescription medicine container to draw a moon, then used masking fluid to mask out the moon, the window, and several fruit trees I decided belonged on a hill not in the photo.

The initial drawing and selective masking of 'Winter Barn'

Once that was done, I gave a preliminary wash to the night sky using  Payne’s grey.

First wash over sky using Payne's Grey and a touch of Sepia

The next stage was to define the sky with a second, and darker wash.  This is occasionally referred to as ‘glazing’ by my partners in crime but I just call it a second wash.   I also decided to remove the masked moon and trees by rubbing off the rubbery masking, and then began defining the fruit trees by using Sepia mixed with Payne’s Grey and some Burnt Umber using a fan brush to give the feeling of many branches against a moonlit night.

blocking-in of fruit trees

I also used a small rigger brush to create more defined trees within the grove . . .

more tree detail . . .

As you can see, I also added shadows using Payne’s Grey and Thalo Blue.  I want to convey the impression that they are growing on a hillside.  And now it is time to begin the initial washes over the wood of the barn.  The red in the photograph is not the red of my memory.  I want the red of the barn in Granville, and not the red of Joseph Hogan’s barn photo.

initial barn washes and grasses on the hill

The next several illustrations show the development of the barn–the attention paid to the stonework, the window, the planks, the grasses and shadows.  This takes me hours, and is somewhat distressing (in a I-just-want-a-Marlboro kind of way) because again, this is taking a photo of an anonymous barn in the daylight and changing it into a personal painting of a memory-laden place where my teenage self got lost in imagining futures (a different one every time I went out there–but all of them grand).  In other words, there’s no blueprint to follow and it needs to look authentic, yet I have no scene before me to guide my brush–I must let the painting tell me where to go next . . .

more detail

more definition added to barn's stonework and planks . . .

yet more detail . . .

Finally, it took several days to stew over how to find the guts to put in the barn’s frosty shadows.  I say ‘guts’ because with watercolour, there’s no turning back–once darks are laid in, they’re there to stay.  (At any point along the way, an ill-advised decision has many a time consigned my work to the ‘not good enough’ heap.)  And I chose to use a sponge and Payne’s Grey mixed with Thalo Blue to provide a texture-like effect to the snow covered grasses in front of the barn.

I then spattered Payne’s Grey over the wooden parts of the barn and over the fruit trees.  I also spattered Yellow Ochre onto the stonework, and used it to sponge-in more grasses.  Selective spattering adds the feeling of age to the barn, and more depth to the trees.

To finally convey the effect of a moonlit Wintery night, I spattered Opaque White over the whole to give the feel of a fine powder of snow falling gently onto the scene.

This may yet prove to be the final rendering of this subject–but then again, I may still stand back and feel it’s missing the mark (which I do feel it is, but can’t quite figure out how) and get in there and muck around some more.  I actually do think I may spatter a bit more snow into the air . . . .

Final (maybe) version of "Winter Barn" by Lance Weisser relying on an image by Joseph Hogan (with permission)

I’ve enjoyed sharing this process with you.  More than that, I have come to appreciate with increasing affection and encouragement your own artistic endeavours.  You all spur me on, and make me happy that I’ve chosen watercolour as my medium to share as I take heart in your photos, pottery, paintings, drawings, computer art, and poetry.

Thank you for being my friends.

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93 Responses to “Start to Finish . . .”

  1. Walang anuman 😉

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  2. salamat sa iyo ay i

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  3. What I like about blogging is looking at blogs and seeing their inspiring work. No, you inspire me. Say hi to Raul for me.

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  4. You are about the most positive and supportive person outside of Raul that I know–AS encouraging and kind. Thank you so much Jen.

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  5. Wow, you do amazing art..I can see your house as a mini-gallery. Great post and keep on entertaining…

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  6. Hey man, don’t feel badly about anything! You’re a very busy student with lots of expectations laid on you, and you shouldn’t feel anything but STRESSED OUT. So thank you for taking the time. To answer your question, watercolours are almost exclusively painted on watercolour paper, of which there are many choices. Basically, though, it boils down to ‘Rough’ (very textured), ‘Cold Press’ (a bit of ‘tooth’ to it), and ‘Hot Press’ (smooth, like poster paper). Each receives the paint in its own unique way, and appeals to different watercolourists depending on his/her style. ‘Hot Press’ is so smooth that the paint floats over the surface and creates a unique flow-quality, and also is good for those who wish to do detailed paintings. I use ‘Hot Press’ for my bird miniatures because I can literally paint individual feathers. ‘Rough’ is great for outdoor scenes which feature rocks and trees with textured bark and sun shining across an expanse of water because the paint gets snagged into the pocks and pits of the paper and texture can be indicated easily as a result. But a great many choose ‘Cold Press’ because it allows the best of both. I hope that answers your question, which I appreciate your asking. I enjoy your writing very much. And I wish you well in all your endeavours.

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  7. Hey Weisser,

    I feel bad for not visiting often enough.

    I love the fact that you posted the process of a painting. I love looking at them and finding out what the process is. Maybe you could post a video one day?

    Also, what kind of surfaces are there for watercolour painting? You said that hot press paper is ‘smooth as glass’, so would that give off like a glossy, smooth sort of look to it?

    – AGIAD

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  8. I am enjoying your collages. Thank you very much for coming by and making these comments.

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  9. makingmade said

    Just gorgeous! Thanks for sharing your whole process with us!

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  10. Welcome, Dear! I envy you for your talent, one of the talents that I wish I have. I know you can invade England and I know you will. Wink! Tnx also for the lovely compliments and for your regular visit onto my blog. xxxxx

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  11. Thank you, Ma! I wish I could travel like you–I love your photos of England and Windsor Castle.

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  12. Ceramic Art and Design said

    Thank you!

    Like

  13. WOW!!! Looks amazing! Wish I can draw or paint too. Sadly I can only draw stick images and people. 😦
    Nice! Very nice! Such a masterpiece!
    xxxxxxx

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  14. Thank you, Leonora! I am enjoying your ceramic installations very much.

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  15. Ceramic Art and Design said

    Wow absolutely beautiful from the start to the end.

    Like

  16. I am enjoying your site and the recent photos of otters. They are such a mesmerizing animal. Thank you for your insights into painting, and for visiting today.

    Like

  17. I came here from photobackstory and am glad I did. I very much liked seeing your process and as an artist myself, can sympathize with you on never being quite done or not sure what is yet to be done. Even when I design buildings, the feeling of something more is always there. Your watercolor is lovely, I did scroll through many of your works.

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  18. How very kind you are to me, Melanie. I love your site.

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  19. Lance, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this post and learning about your process. You are not only a wonderful artist (I’ve been poking around), you are a marvelous writer. I’m delighted to step into your world a little bit and am eager to learn more.

    Like

  20. I am very glad you stopped by and told me this. Thank you for sharing your own personal progression under challenging circumstances.

    Like

  21. Fergiemoto said

    Wow! Thanks for sharing this progression. It was nice to see how the final piece materialized.

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  22. Thank you so much, Francina. But you know, you take a blank piece of paper and make a beautiful poem on it–it must be great to be able to do THAT!!!!

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  23. Francina said

    Fascinating process.. from nothing to something so beautiful.. wow.. it must be great to be able to do this. Thank you for showing the process!

    Ciao, Francina

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  24. It would make me so very proud and happy if anything on these pages inspired you to once again take up the brush. I must say, observing your photo journey will inspire many to take up the camera. Nice to meet you on the internet Maggie.

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  25. Maggie L R said

    I really enjoyed reading how your painting comes together. I have been doing a lot of photography, but an=m leaning to get back into painting. It has been some time. You have inspired me.

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  26. gweaverii said

    I forgot to click on whatever that “notify me” thing is so I only just found your reply. You are absolutely right. It IS the barn color. I’m smiling that you are so humble in your relationship to your painting and to the people who love your paintings.

    Lord, I need that Wild Turkey in my coffee this morning! It’s nasty and wet and cold down here today. My old joints might just start to creak. I think they’re supposed to at my age.

    I see your comments on other blogs and I like what I see. Thanks for being so supportive of my little blog. I look for your approval when I post. How silly is that? 😉

    Like

  27. Thank you very much. I am enjoying your site and your stories and your photo challenge. I appreciate your interest in stopping by.

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  28. THANK YOU! I’ve been checking out your site and you have a huge variety of posts, covering everything from interior design to the latest entertainment. Thank you for your enthusiasm!

    Like

  29. I have been enjoying your posts about gargoyles in Sydney and then linking onto a site you have listed which show many beautiful birds.

    Thank you for this lovely comment, and for coming by and making me feel good, Selma.

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  30. Well, my goodness Kerry–I can’t feel any more exhilarated hearing that from you, especially after seeing the terrific photos you have at your site. They are simply inspiring to me–and particularly your newest segment on the presentation of wildflowers.

    I absolutely concur that as beautiful individually as they certainly are, the true beauty of wildflowers is their impact when used as a visual carpet or landscaping blanket. And you show this masterfully!

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  31. Well, dear Jane, if more people are coming by it’s certainly more due to you than to me! Thank you for providing a link from your High River Arts site to my posting of ‘Winter Horses’–and better yet, becoming the owner of it. I revel in your support and enthusiasm.

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  32. kerryl29 said

    Just re-read this entire installment and reviewed each incremental image of the work in progress…I reiterate what I wrote earlier: absolutely fascinating!

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  33. Ah Lance, as usual a wonderful painting, narrative and teaching lesson. I’m glad more people are seeing your work and hearing your words!

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  34. THANK YOU! I’ve been checking out your site and you have a huge variety of posts, covering everything from interior design to the latest entertainment. Thank you for your enthusiasm!

    Like

  35. Hareem said

    This is some really great work!

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  36. WOW the painting is simply amazing … I looked at the final painting and went back to the original photograph, all i can say is WOW stunning !

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  37. Selma said

    So interesting. You have such talent but more than that – you are a teacher. I am not an artist myself but I can relate to your process and have learnt from it. Thank you so much. I really enjoyed this!

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  38. kerryl29 said

    This may be the most fascinating, useful…okay, I’ll say it…level BEST blog post I’ve ever read, anywhere. I’m going to come back later and read it all over again.

    And, not incidentally, the final painting itself is simply outstanding.

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  39. It is very good of you to tell me. I find your blog very courageous.

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  40. Oh thank you so very much, nia. You are wonderful.

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  41. nia said

    You are so nice dear Lance, my Thanks can’t be enough for you, I am crazy with art, and with paintings… You are doing and sharing great things with us. Makes me excited always and I love to watch your works… Please there is no need for sorry, we are all same, sometimes busy, sometimes we can miss… No problem.
    Whatever you find inspirational in my photographs you can make paintings if you wish dear Lance. Blessing and Happiness, with my love, nia

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  42. I am certainly enjoying your photographs. Your life and travels is fascinating and generously shared with us by you T. B. M.

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  43. Thank you thank you thank you for featuring my site in your posting today, nia. I am sorry I didn’t see this until just now! I appreciate this so much.

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  44. Oh nia, that is such a sweet and encouraging thing to say! I was away all day yesterday and only just now saw this, and feel badly that I am only responding just now. This is such a lovely paragraph to read and take inspiration from. Thank you so much. Today your photos of the two children playing and the wet sidewalk, are GORGEOUS. I love how you turn the photos into paintings.

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  45. Well, I could throw whole dozens of roses at your feet for the photos you bring us, Graham. Thank you for this encouraging word!

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  46. I’m honoured by your remarks, Lloyd. Your photographs have tremendous mood and feeling and draw out alot of emotion when I view them.

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  47. Thank you very much Ms. Murray—and I am so pleased to have found your blog and the photos of snow-covered bushes and walkways in the silvery grey light. Personally, I am glad there wasn’t bright sun! I love them how you’ve captured them in their mysterious beauty. I always appreciate artists taking the time to venture out when it’s not really so nice, and bring back for us these magical images.

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  48. You are very kind to me, Manipal. I appreciate all your comments and love the photo of the leaf on the walkway featured in your photo for today.

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  49. 7theaven said

    Excellent guide, and the final product, excellent!

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  50. beautiful painting – I especially like the trees on the right and the mood.

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  51. TBM said

    I loved seeing the evolution of your work. Thanks!

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  52. Lloyd said

    That was interesting to see the process.The final painting is really beautiful. The trees and the conversion to night were excellent touches.

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  53. Fascinating! It was very enjoyable to be afforded a glimpse of the various stages involved in the creative process leading up to completion (?) of this lovely work.

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  54. Thank you for telling me this, ‘futlooz’! I am happy you found something useful in my doing this kind of explanation. It makes it all worthwhile. The original photograph is wonderful, actually, but of course I am happy that you enjoy both pieces in their own unique way.

    I hope everyone visits your blog to see what you have in store for them today.

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  55. shurteac said

    Thank you much!

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  56. That’s way beyond the expected, and over-the-top kind of you to say, JoDee. However, if I ever do the unthinkable and leave my marriage to watercolour, it’ll be you I’ll contact for lessons.

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  57. JoDee Luna said

    I’m smitten. If you ever decide to provide online training, count me in. I’d gladly pay for lessons!

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  58. Very thoughtfully kind on your part ‘incidentallearner’–however, please do what you do and keep doing it with the same abandon and freely-applied imaginative use of your mind, your paints, and your love of water.

    It’s your love of water that is the mark of a true watercolourist. Those who skimp on it, and try to control its every move are best left to acrylics. But those who splash and play and discover are watercolour’s best friends.

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  59. Standing Ovation!!!!! Thank you so much..the process de-mystified! I’m entralled and going back for a second read and view! Thank you so much for posting. What a great way to document your methodology.

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  60. kofegeek said

    yups 🙂 , I am getting bored with my black and white doodles at kofeart.wordpress.com, I want something more colorful like yours

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  61. First of all I should say thins, “how I wanted to make wateercolour painting now”… It is so exciting and so enjoyable… Once I was in an artist’s studio to learn watercolour paintings… I love watercolour… Thank you, million times Thank you for this post, I can come here again and again… You are great artist, your imaginary, your talent and the inspiration of photography, when they all come together is being great and also great inspiration for us too. What an amazing blue touches in there, and what an great contrast with the sky…. and the barn and the trees… like a magical hand touched them. (But nia this is true, this is the artist how presents us what is seen…) Your painting almost fascinated me… And sure, not only being inspired but also I am learning so nice things from you… I really want to start. With my love, nia

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  62. futlooz said

    Call it telepathy or something, I was only going to request you to share with us your draft paintings and how you go about from ‘start to finish’ and there you go with your post. Your humility is very inspiring, and I really liked your touch in the painting as opposed to the original. Thanks for sharing.

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  63. Thank you so much Cornel, for your very kind remarks. I love all your postings.

    You are no amateur when it comes to painting orthodox icons. Your work is very beautiful and very detailed, and follows a centuries’ long tradition. I hope many visitors click onto your icon feature.

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  64. Very nice.
    Your work is fascinating and it’s inspiring.
    I used watercolours just when I was a little kid, so like amateur.
    Yor work it’s nice but very hard.
    You need patience and precision.
    Thank you for sharing.
    🙂

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  65. I appreciate your taking the time to leave this nice comment to me, Michelle. I enjoy your photos and the variety of work on your site. Your palette is your quilts. They are absolutely stunning.

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  66. Thank you so very much, sandy. I value everything from you a great deal. You have sensitivity and the gifts which bring them to full expression.

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  67. Wonderful to hear from you, and thank you for your effusiveness. However, your skills with the camera are my source of envy. You seem to have the gift of gaining access to people when they are in repose, or unaware of your presence. The series of New York celebrations is delightful. I love that city for all its audacious charm.

    I recall once commenting to my mother that my New York friends were so pushy. She said to me, “What they say about New Yorker’s is true–they’re pushy; but they like to be pushed back.”

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  68. I think you’re being a bit modest, friend cyclist. You and your wife’s drawings and paintings (I love the ducks) are inspiring to me because you have a great simplicity of line which I always find challenging. Thank you for your encouragement and support.

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  69. You deserve that ‘Plooferific Award’ , kofegeek. Thank you for your very kind comments, and I hope you really continue painting because it’s a great way to express yourself.

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  70. Yes, Arches IS great paper. Thank you for your wise advice. And I keep coming back that barn of yours in black and white. It is hauntingly lovely.

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  71. Yes, quite so–I have already cut the painting down from its original size by using this particular mat. But the mat also forces the painting into two distinct halves. So I am going to now cut a new mat to show more trees and less barn.

    That’s very helpful to me, Fiona, and I appreciate your observation very much. Good on you.

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  72. Thank you, Darryl. I enjoy your sharing your music, and introducing other artists.

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  73. Oh, you have the patience of St. David walking to Jerusalem! And skill I wish I had when wielding a camera. I don’t understand them. Your willingness to tramp around Wales and your own environs during the misty, spell-binding times of day and year almost makes me squirm with delight to witness the results. I love the ‘Bristley Screes’ series so very much.

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  74. Love this post!

    Thank you for outlining your process…watercolours fascinate me, I had given it a try when I was younger (I actually still have my supplies and sketchbook from high school). I like to admire other people’s work now. 🙂 LOL!

    Love the barn wood and the orchards out back.

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  75. Thank YOU Robert, for offering me such encouragement! I also enjoy seeing the process (when it’s someone else). I suppose the photographic equivalent was standing there in the red glow of the dark room, waiting to see what would magically come to life in the developer and ‘baths’, etc. Or perhaps, you still do this?

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  76. Thank you again, Mags. You make my day. And the segment of the Blue Whale you’ve posted is awe-inspiring. I start smiling even before I’ve seen what you have posted each day–I just know it’s going to make me happy!

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  77. hahahaha, oh lordy–they go together like egg rolls and plum sauce. But . . . let’s not kid anyone–I quit four years ago and have been diagnosed with mild COPD. I’m in my 65th year and in order to rectify things, for the past year and a half I’ve swum 2.5 kms of the front crawl (100 lengths) three times a week. That keeps the COPD in check, and helped me lose 25 lbs AND cut my cholesterol reading from 5.7 (Canadian measurements) to 2.48 AND made my doctor reduce my heart medication down to the lowest possible dosage.

    –Love your remarks, and your kindness to me, Adam. Your cemetery photos posted today have great atmosphere.

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  78. Wonderful. I absolutely take heart in your pithy observations, and actually believe the issue is the barn itself. By rights, it should be given a wash of Payne’s Grey to cast it in the same depth of shadow as the ground before it.

    You better lay down that camera and grab a brush, there Missy.

    Thank you for adding another dimension to this effort. If I were there, I’d give you a hug and we’d have some Wild Turkey in a coffee mug.

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  79. sandy said

    Thanks so much for posting the process. The finish painting is lovely. I am really taken with the orchard.

    Like

  80. Victor Ho said

    Great! I spent a while commenting and it kicked me out. And with old age, memory is a problem these days – ha! So to recap, this is a great essay. You are a true artist and I have to say that I now better appreciate all the decision making that goes into the process from paper to paint. I have never pretended to be an artist though I have been surrounded by many in the family. Thanks so much for documenting the process. I hope the watercolour will finally get to your high level of satisfaction.

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  81. therustychaincyclist said

    Thanks for sharing the process. I keep trying watercolor and always marvel at those that “get it”. Keep up the good work.

    Like

  82. BoJo Photo said

    Nice subject matter.

    Arches is a great paper!

    Nice drawing.

    I love how you dream.

    Wow! An amazing painting. I would walk away if I was you. My friend that used to be in special operations told me, “Study long, study wrong!” 🙂 Seriously, I think your painting is fabulous and I would walk away!

    Like

  83. kofegeek said

    wow…this is so useful for me as an amateur..I was learning how to draw with water color by my self, this tutorial help me a lot ….so helpful 🙂

    Like

  84. Fiona said

    Absolutely fascinating to see the process, from the choice of subject, the personal narrative to the execution. I love the delicacy of touch and the confident way you build up your washes.

    As for mucking around with it more.. I know from experience how many of these end up in my own waste-paper bin.
    I am quite the beginner at landscape painting, so am not at all qualified to make suggestions to such a talented and accomplished painter.

    But is it perhaps that the composition is a potentially difficult one, with the painting divided strongly into two halves? I love the fruit trees, such beautiful brushwork, just wonderful, but if I hold a piece of paper across the painting to reflect the composition of the original photo i.e. 2/3 barn and 1/3 trees (including the wonderful moon) the barn becomes more important, the moonlight and the trees retain their mystery and the path in front leads off into my imagination. Not sure if that’s at all helpful!

    I’m so glad that I found your blog. You have a wonderfully warm approach in your writing and in the sharing of your work ~Fiona

    Like

  85. dbmcnz said

    Thanks for sharing and the stories.

    Like

  86. maenamor said

    I love paintings…I can look and appreciate the image, seeing the work that goes into them is just incredible. I just wish I had the skill and patience that you have 😉

    Like

  87. Nothing short of amazing. I love seeing things unfold from start to finish – this was very cool. Thank you for sharing this!

    Like

  88. Magsx2 said

    Hi,
    Wow, I love the painting.
    I really enjoyed looking at how this painting all came together, bit by bit. I think it looks great done in night mode. I love the way you have done the moon, with a halo around it, it just looks unbelievable. The whole painting looks fantastic.
    Very nice work indeed. 😀

    Like

  89. shurteac said

    That’s really neat…it is kind of interesting to see the whole process and how the washes get layered. WordPress kinda has an advantage over instructional books; you can post as many photos as you need to show the whole process. Unlike say a book where they’ve got a painting example and two pages to show the process, you can show all the steps.

    I can’t imagine watercoloring with a nicotine addiction, incidentally…that paint drying is time sensitive…

    Like

  90. gweaverii said

    This process is fascinating. I’ve always been in awe of the watercolorist’s gutsy approach to painting. As you said, one mistake and you’re done for. I think that and the overall effect of watercolor is why I have collected so many of them over the years. I agree. A tiny bit more snow might be in order. Not much, just a bit more to integrate the bright barn into the dark, coldness of the landscape behind the barn. 😉 I have no idea if this makes sense. I am only a lifelong observer and lover of art. I know nothing of technique. I think the sharp contrast in mood is what’s bothering you. (Lord, George, you’re such a brazen busybody!) I love your work, by the way!

    Like

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